Dx-pedition & Various

Burundi is Ranked
66 in the world

We have 5 stations:

  • 2 SSB
  • 2 CW
  • 1 RTTY

Equipment will consist of:

  • 2 Kenwood 590
  • 2 Icom 7200
  • 1 elecraft k3
  • 1 elecraft k2
  • 5 acom 1011
  • 4 spiderbeam 5 bands
  • 1 Status Quad 2 el. 5 bands
  • 3 phased vertical 30 mt (CW) by IK8HCG
  • j-pole 30 mt (RTTY)
  • 4 square for 40 mt (SSB – RTTY)
  • 2 phased vertical 40mt (CW) thanks to IK8HCG
  • 2 vertical full size for 80 mt (1 ssb and 1 cw)
  • inverted L for 160 mt
  • 4 quad for 6 mt

ABOUT BURUNDI:

One of the smallest countries in Africa, Burundi is landlocked and has an equatorial climate. Burundi is a part of the Albertine Rift, the western extension of the East African Rift. The country lies on a rolling plateau in the centre of Africa. The average elevation of the central plateau is 1,707 m (5,600 ft), with lower elevations at the borders. The highest peak, Mount Heha at 2,685 m (8,810 ft), lies to the southeast of the capital, Bujumbura. The source of the Nile River is in Bururi province, and is linked from Lake Victoria to its headwaters via the Ruvyironza River Lake Victoria is also an important water source, which serves as a fork to the Kagera River. Another major lake is Lake Tanganyika, located in much of Burundi’s southwestern corner.

Burundi’s lands are mostly agricultural or pasture. Settlement by rural populations has led to deforestation, soil erosion and habitat loss.Deforestation of the entire country is almost completely due to overpopulation, with a mere 600 km2 (230 sq mi) remaining and an ongoing loss of about 9% per annum. There are two national parks, Kibira National Park to the northwest (a small region of rain forest, adjacent to Nyungwe Forest National Park in Rwanda), Ruvubu National Park to the northeast (along the Rurubu River, also known as Ruvubu or Ruvuvu). Both were established in 1982 to conserve wildlife populations.

Burundi is a landlocked, resource-poor country with an underdeveloped manufacturing sector. The economy is predominantly agricultural; agriculture accounts for just over 30% of GDP and employs more than 90% of the population. Burundi’s primary exports are coffee and tea, which account for 90% of foreign exchange earnings, though exports are a relatively small share of GDP. Burundi’s export earnings – and its ability to pay for imports – rests primarily on weather conditions and international coffee and tea prices.
color chart of exports by value with percentages
Graphical depiction of Burundi’s product exports in 28 colour-coded categories.

Burundi is one of the world’s poorest countries, owing in part to its landlocked geography, poor legal system, lack of economic freedom, lack of access to education, and the proliferation of HIV/AIDS. Approximately 80% of Burundi’s population lives in poverty. Famines and food shortages have occurred throughout Burundi, most notably in the 20th century,and according to the World Food Programme, 56.8% of children under age five suffer from chronic malnutrition. One scientific study of 178 nations rated Burundi’s population as having the lowest satisfaction with life in the world.As a result of deep poverty, Burundi is dependent on foreign aid.
two sitting in skiff on beach on lakeshore with mountains in bckround
Fishermen on Lake Tanganyika.

Burundi’s largest industry is agriculture, which accounted for just over 30% of the GDP.[15] Subsistence agriculture accounts for 90% of agriculture. The nation’s largest source of revenue is coffee, which makes up 93% of Burundi’s exports. Other agricultural products include cotton, tea, maize, sorghum, sweet potatoes, bananas, manioc (tapioca); beef, milk, and hides. Foreign Policy reports, Subsistence farming is highly relied upon, however due to large population growth and no coherent policies governing land ownership, many people don’t have the resources to sustain themselves. In 2014, the average farm size was about one acre. Burundi has the severest hunger and malnourishment rates of all 120 countries ranked in the Global Hunger Index.”

Some of Burundi’s natural resources include uranium, nickel, cobalt, copper, and platinum. Besides agriculture, other industries include: assembly of imported components; public works construction; food processing, and light consumer goods such as blankets, shoes, and soap.

In regards to telecommunications infrastructure, Burundi is ranked 2nd to last in the World Economic Forum’s Network Readiness Index (NRI) – an indicator for determining the development level of a country’s information and communication technologies. Burundi ranked number 147 overall in the 2014 NRI ranking, down from 144 in 2013.

Lack of access to financial services is a serious problem for the majority of the population, particularly in the densely populated rural areas: only 2% of the total population holds bank accounts, and fewer than 0.5% use bank lending services. Microfinance, however, plays a larger role, with 4% of Burundians being members of microfinance institutions – a larger share of the population than that reached by banking and postal services combined. 26 licensed microfinance institutions (MFIs) offer savings, deposits, and short- to medium-term credit. Dependence of the sector on donor assistance is limited.

Burundi is part of the East African Community and a potential member of the planned East African Federation. Economic growth in Burundi is relatively steady but Burundi is still behind neighbouring countries.